Perth Pool Fencing

Why Should You get Perth Fence to install Your Pool Fence?

In Western Australia, the design, construction and installation of private swimming and spa pools and their safety barriers is subject to strict building requirements.

Owners and occupiers also have ongoing legal obligations to maintain their safety barriers at all times.

We build Fences that are attractive and effective, and comply with the Australian Standards and council regulations.

Safety First

Statistical evidence shows that the majority of drownings in private swimming pools involve children under five years of age. Pool fencing is a vital protective measure.

Plenty of Options

We can build your fence using aluminium or steel tube, glass and a range of other great looking secure materials and methods. A portion of your pool fence may be boundary fence. We can make it all fit together beautifully.

Quality Install

We do all our jobs according to manufacturer’s installation guidelines, Australian Standards and applicable government laws.

Standards Compliant

Our fences are built to meet Australian Standards so they protect the safety of young children by restricting their access to the area containing the swimming or spa pool.

Free On-site-Quote

A pool fence is never a simple project. There are many factors that must be considered. We’ll come to your site, and give a free assessment of your requirements, before offering our solution.

Warranty Protection

Colorbond, Hardifence and our various glass, aluminium and steel fencing solutions are coverered by manufacturing warranties up to 10 years (depending on product).

Protect kids with a fence that is Difficult to get under, over or through

What Are The Rules?

In Western Australia, the design, construction and installation of private swimming and spa pools and their safety barriers is subject to strict building requirements .

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Under the Building Regulations 2012 (the Regulations), owners and occupiers also have ongoing legal obligations to maintain their safety barriers at all times.

All private swimming and spa pools that contain water that is more than 300 mm deep must have a compliant barrier installed that restricts access by young children to the pool and its immediate surrounds.

If you do not comply with the Regulations you risk the lives of young children and may face substantial fines.

A private swimming or spa pool contains water to a depth of at least 300mm and is associated with:

  • a Class 1a dwelling (eg house, villa, town house);
  • less than 30 sole-occupancy units in a Class 2 building (eg apartments, flats); or
  • a Class 4 part of a building (eg caretaker’s dwelling).
  • Public pools = different rules

According to the Building Act 2011 and the Building Regulations 2012, private swimming or spa pools include:

  • in-ground and above-ground pools (including in atable and portable pools);
  • in-ground and above-ground spa pools (but not spa baths that are normally emptied after each use); and
  • bathing or wading pools.

Source:Rules for Pools and Spas“. From the Government of Western Australia’s Department of Commerce – Building Commission.

Pool Gate Safety

To maximise your pool safety, it is vital that your pool gate remain closed at all times, cannot be opened by children, and cannot be easily climbed. To make sure of this, all our gates are installed with the following features:

 

  • Fitted with a self-closing device that will automatically return the door to the closed position. It must allow the self- latching device to operate without the application of manual force from any position that the door is capable of opening, including when resting on the latch;
  • Fitted with an automated self- latching device that will prevent the door from being re-opened without the application of manual force on the latch release mechanism;
  • The operating part of the latch release mechanism must be at least 150cm above the door; and
  • The gate does not contain protruding footholds that would allow a young child to climb the door and release the latching device.
pool fence perth
pool fencing perth

Other Safety Measures

Safety and standards are our first priority. Aesthetics are also important. Some of the things we take into consideration include

  • All parts of a barrier must have an effective height at least 1200 mm
  • Where the barrier has horizontal members, the highest of the low members must be at least 1100 mm from the top of the barrier
  • When measured from the top of the barrier, objects (such as such as BBQs, garden retaining walls, garden furniture, water features/ornaments, and trees/ shrubs ) that may create a foothold for young children to climb over, must not be within 1200mm of the barrier.

There are many other detailed considerations that must be accounted for. Our detailed checklists cover everything.

perth pool fence
pool fence perth

Let us help Make Sure Your Pool Fence Is Safe And Effective

Frequently Asked Questions

Does my spa pool require a barrier?

Yes. A spa pool, whether portable or fixed, comes under the de nition of a ‘private swimming pool’ in the Regulations and must have a compliant barrier.

Who is responsible for ensuring the swimming or spa pool has a compliant barrier?

Each owner and occupier of a property on
which there is a private swimming or spa pool containing water that is more than 300 mm deep must ensure that a compliant barrier is installed and maintained so that it is compliant with the Regulations at all times.

What is my local government’s role in relation to my swimming pool?

Your local government is responsible for monitoring compliance with the requirements that apply to your swimming or spa pool barrier by:

  • acting as a permit authority by receiving and processing building permit applications for swimming and spa pools and their associated barriers;
  • arranging and conducting inspections of barriers at least once every four years; and
  • issuing infringement notices or commencing legal proceedings if a barrier is found to be non-compliant.

Some local governments may provide additional services including pool safety barrier advice.

Is a building permit required to construct a pool and its safety barrier?

In most instances a building permit will be required to construct, erect or install a swimming or spa pool and its safety barrier. Please contact your local government (permit authority) to discuss whether an exemption under legislation applies to you.

My pool is completed, what happens now?

On completion of works, the person named as the builder on the building permit must obtain an inspection certi cate (Reg. 28 and 29 of the Regulations) and submit it along with a Notice of Completion form to the permit authority (this notice is Building Commission form number BA7 available at: www.commerce.wa.gov.au/building-commission).

The owner/occupier is responsible for ongoing compliance and maintenance of the pool’s safety barrier. The local government will inspect safety barriers at least once every four years.

Remember that supervision of young children is more effective at reducing the incidence of drowning than relying on pool safety barriers.

What can be used as a barrier?

A fence, wall, or other barrier, or a combination of them that is in accordance with the requirements of the applicable barrier standard can be used; a gate, that is in accordance with the requirements of the applicable barrier standard and that opens away from the swimming or spa pool and is self-closing and self-latching; and a window if

it is in accordance with the requirements of the applicable barrier standard.

The barrier can be purpose built pool fencing, brickwork, limestone, glass, metal, bro-cement and even brushwood as long as they meet the requirements of the applicable barrier standard. However, pools installed after 5 November 2001 are not permitted to use a door in a wall of a building that is used as part of the barrier.

Can I use my boundary/dividing fence as part of the barrier?

Yes, subject to the following:

Post-May 2016 pools – the boundary fence must be at least 1800 mm high on the inside for the part of the fence used as a barrier. The fence must be non-climbable and have no climbable objects within NCZ 5.

Pre-May 2016 pools – the boundary fence must be at least 1200 mm high. The fence should be non-climbable with no climbable objects within 1200 mm of the top of the fence. This applies

to at least one side of the fence being either the pool side or the neighbour’s side. Alternatively, pre-May 2016 pools may comply with the post- May 2016 barrier requirements.

If I use a wall of a building as part of the barrier can it contain a window?

Yes. As long as the window is child-resistant in accordance with the applicable barrier standard, it can be contained within a wall that is part of the barrier.

Can I use a door as part of my barrier?

Only under the following circumstances:

  • if the pool is using the pre-November 2001 concession. The door must comply with AS 1926.1-1993;
  • if the door forms part of a barrier to an indoor pool, or the indoor portion of an indoor/outdoor pool. The door must comply with AS 1926.1-2012; or
  • the permit authority issues an approval under Reg. 51 of the Regulations.
Is a deadlock, key lock or pad lock suitable to limit or permanently secure gates, doors and windows?
No. A device that limits or permanently secures these parts of a barrier can only be removed by the use of a tool. Such tools may include Allen keys, pliers, spanners and screwdrivers.
I have an old pre-May 2016 swimming pool, do I need to upgrade my existing safety barrier?
There is no retrospective requirement for owners to upgrade existing compliant barriers for pre-May 2016 pools to the post-May 2016 barrier requirements.
I have an old pre-May 2016 pool that I will be replacing. Can I continue to comply with the pre-May 2016 barrier requirements?

No. The new pool requires a building permit. The pool barrier requirements are triggered by the submission date of the building permit application for the swimming pool.

As such, the pool will be a post-May 2016 pool and must comply with the post-May 2016 barrier requirements.

I have an outdoor pool that was installed after 5 November 2001, under what circumstances can the permit authority issue an approval to allow a door as part of the pool barrier?

The Regulations provide two options:

Option 1 – for all pools:

The permit authority may consider an alternative solution for the pool safety barriers where it is demonstrated that the pool safety barriers meet the performance requirements of the BCA. Where a permit authority approves the use of a door
it must comply with the requirements of AS 1926.1-2012.
Option 2 – for pre-May 2016 pools:

The permit authority may consider approval of a door as part of the barrier only where:

  • it is the opinion of the permit authority that to install a barrier between the premises and the pool would create
    a structural problem that cannot be controlled by the owner or occupier of the property;
  • the pool is totally enclosed by a building; or
  • if it is the opinion of the permit authority that a separate barrier between the premises and pool would create a su cient problem for a person with a disability who is a resident at the premises and wishes to have access to the pool.

For the purposes of approving the use of a door for a person with a disability, that person needs to produce a certi cate that has been issued by the National Disability Services (ACN 008445485), certifying that the person has a disability that makes it diffcult for the person to use a gate of the kind that would be required by the Regulations in a swimming pool barrier.

Prior to deciding whether to give approval for the use of a door, the permit authority must have regard as to whether or not a young child resides at the premises. Where a permit authority approves the use of a door it must comply with the requirements of AS 1926.1-1993.

I have an existing pre-May 2016 outdoor pool using the pre-November 2001 concession and I want to install bi-fold doors as part of the barrier to replace the old door. Are these permissible?

No. Bi-fold doors are not permitted as they do not meet the requirements of AS 1926.1-1993. French Doors may only be used if one side is permanently fixed closed and the other side complies with AS 1926.1-1993 ie self-closing with a child-resistant doorset that meets the requirements of AS 1926.1-1993.

I have an existing pre-May 2016 outdoor swimming pool using the pre-November 2001 concession and I want to install a new spa pool. Part of the barrier is a wall with a compliant door. Do I need a separate safety barrier for the new spa pool?

Yes. Whilst the barrier to your existing swimming pool is permitted to include a child- resistant door because of the concession for swimming pools installed prior to 5 November 2001, your new spa and its safety barrier must comply with the BCA (post-May 2016 requirements). The post-May 2016 requirement does not permit doors to form part of the barrier.

Does my above-ground pool require a barrier?

The walls of the above-ground pool may be
used as part of the barrier if they are 1200 mm high; non-climbable and comply with the applicable barrier standard. Where a permanent or temporary ladder is used to gain access to the pool, there must be a separate compliant barrier around the ladder. There must be no climbable objects to facilitate climbing, such as the lter and pumps.

I have recently purchased lockable hard covers for my swimming and spa pool. Is this sufficient to comply with the barrier requirements?
No. Placing a cover, even if it is lockable, over a swimming or spa pool does not meet the barrier requirements under the Regulations and the applicable barrier standard. When the cover is off there is no barrier. Your statutory obligations are to provide a permanent compliant barrier to restrict access to the swimming or spa pool area by young children at all times.
Do I need to put a safety barrier around my fish pond?
As fish ponds are not used for swimming, wading, paddling or the like they are not required under the Regulations to have a compliant safety barrier. However, fish ponds still pose a risk for young children and it is suggested that owners/ occupiers consider providing safety barriers, or other devices.
Does my toddler’s wading pool need a safety barrier?

If the toddler’s wading pool contains water that is more than 300 mm deep, it will require a compliant safety barrier.

These types of pools, regardless of their depth, are still a constant source of danger to young children.

Note: These FAQ and answers are sourced from the Government of Western Australia’s Department of Commerce – Building Commission. They have put out a very handy booklet “Rules for Pools and Spas“, which is a great guideline for this topic. We have partially reproduced the contents of the booklet in the public interest. We recommend you read the booklet, which we can provide on request.